DAHIRA CHAOCHAUENSIS (Clark, 1922)

Female Dahira chaochauensis. Photo: © NHMUK Male Dahira chaochauensis. Photo: © NHMUK

TAXONOMY

Gurelca chaochauensis Clark, 25 January 1922, Proc. New Engl. zool. Club 8: 13. Type locality: East China, [Guangdong,] Chao-chau, [Chaozhou].

Synonym. Gurelca chaochauensis Clark, 25 January 1922.

Synonym. Micracosmeryx chaochauensis (Clark, 25 January 1922).

Synonym. Micracosmeryx macroglossoides Mell, 1922.

Note. Recent morphological work and unpublished DNA analyses, using both nuclear and mitochondrial sequences, demonstrates that this species belongs in the genus Dahira (Haxaire, Melichar & Manjunatha, 2021).


ADULT DESCRIPTION AND VARIATION

The morphology of the apical process of the phallus in the male genitalia is typical of Dahira. Additionally, with the recent discoveries of some further species of Dahira with yellow patterning on the hindwings, such as D. nili Brechlin, 2006, D. taiwana (Brechlin, 1998) and Dahira uljanae Brechlin & Melichar, 2006, and the great expansion of the genus concept in terms of species number and diversity, the wing pattern of D. chaochauensis is no longer so surprising and fits well within the taxon (Haxaire, Melichar & Manjunatha, 2021).


ADULT BIOLOGY

Can be abundant at certain locations during the right season (Mell, 1922b).


FLIGHT-TIME

China: iii (Hunan); iii (Guangdong).


EARLY STAGES

OVUM: Unknown.

LARVA: Not recorded, but reared by Mell, 1922b.

PUPA: Not recorded, but reared by Mell, 1922b.


Pupa of Dahira chaochauensis. Image: Mell, 1922b Pupa of Dahira chaochauensis. Image: Mell, 1922b

Larval hostplants. Not recorded, but reared by Mell, 1922b.


PARASITOIDS

Unknown.


LOCAL DISTRIBUTION

China: Zhejiang (Tianmu Shan; Hangzhou); Hunan (Nanling Forest, 700-800m); Guangdong (Chaozhou).


GLOBAL DISTRIBUTION

Southeastern China and northern Vietnam.


Global distribution of Dahira chaochauensis. Map: © NHMUK.

BIOGEOGRAPHICAL AFFILIATION



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© A.R. Pittaway & I.J. Kitching (The Natural History Museum, London)