MACROGLOSSUM SEMIFASCIATA Hampson, [1893]

Female Macroglossum semifasciata. Photo: © BMNH Male Macroglossum semifasciata. Photo: © BMNH

TAXONOMY

Macroglossa semifasciata Hampson, [1893], Fauna Brit. India 1: 115. Type locality: [Burma,] East Pegu; [Malaysia, Sarawak,] Labuan.


ADULT DESCRIPTION AND VARIATION

Wingspan: 65--70mm. Forewing upperside antemedian lines oblique, the space between them narrow, black only posteriorly, where it is curved basad; first and second discal bands indistinct, the space between them not black. Hindwing upperside base more extensively black than in similar species, joined along the anal margin to the distal border. Abdomen upperside with yellow lateral patches very small, the black patches prominent; seventh segment with a black mesial patch; anal tuft dark, side tufts white tipped. Palpus grey, thorax underside darker. Abdomen underside with ill-defined buffish-grey mesial patches on proximal segments; seventh sternite more or less grey in female.

In the male genitalia, uncus truncate. Gnathos rounded apically, carinate dorsally. Valve with stridulatory scales. Harpe slender, pointed. Aedeagus with process obtuse, dentate, its base projecting, two rows of teeth at its base; the longer internal rod tapering, but not produced into a needle-like process.


ADULT BIOLOGY


FLIGHT-TIME


EARLY STAGES

OVUM:

LARVA: When full-grown, horn long, head and body blackish-brown dotted with grey. There is a dark dorsal stripe from segment 2 to base of horn, and a pale dorso-lateral stripe on the head and anterior segments of body (Bell & Scott, 1937 (after Piepers, 1897)).

PUPA:

Larval hostplants. Unknown.


PARASITOIDS


LOCAL DISTRIBUTION

China: Yunnan.


GLOBAL DISTRIBUTION

Northeastern India, Burma/Myanmar, Thailand, southwestern China, Vietnam, Malaysia (Peninsular, Sarawak), Indonesia (Sumatra, Java, Kalimantan).


Global distribution of Macroglossum semifasciata. Map: © BMNH.

BIOGEOGRAPHICAL AFFILIATION



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© A.R. Pittaway & I.J. Kitching (The Natural History Museum, London)